Author: Joy Hinyikiwile

By JOY HINYIKIWILE After a five-year-long battle against Rhodes University, former Rhodes student, Yolanda Dyantyi, has given up her quest to hold Rhodes University accountable for instituting a disciplinary process against her and permanently excluding her from the university. On 13 September, Dyantyi announced on various social media platforms that she had accepted that her journey with Rhodes University had ended. She will not return to the university to complete her undergraduate degree after the university abruptly excluded her in November 2017, during the final semester of her study programme. She was left with writing two exams before completing her…

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By JOY HINYIKIWILE A new book, ‘Sexual and Reproductive Justice: From the Margins to the Centre’, foregrounds communities left at the margins of sexual and reproductive health services. Edited by Rhodes alumni Dr Tracy Morison and Dr Jabulile Mary-Jane Jace Mavuso, it was recently launched during a hybrid online and in-person discussion at Rhodes with speakers and attendees connecting from various parts of the world via Zoom. Tracy Morrison. Photo: https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Tracy-Morison According to Morrison, who spoke at the launch, Reproductive Justice works to highlight how people’s sexual and reproductive lives are contoured by the intersections of gender, classes, race and…

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By JOY HINYIKIWILE Improved performances in Grade 9 Mathematics and reading literacy shows that quality instructional school leadership leads to good academic performance. This is according to research by Dr Dumisani Hompashe on the impact of school instructional leadership on learning outcomes in South Africa. Dr Hompashe is a senior lecturer at the University of Fort Hare and a research associate at the Research for Socio-Economic Policy (Re-SEP) and the Institute of Social and Economic Research at Stellenbosch University and Rhodes University. The research aimed to investigate the impact of school leadership on learner performance after the country improved its…

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By JOY HINYIKIWILE Learning was again disrupted at Mary Waters High School when parents and learners protested teacher absenteeism on Thursday morning. The protestors closed the school’s gate and refused to let anyone in until their concerns were addressed. They said they were protesting because Matric Mathematics Literacy and Grade 10 Life Orientation classes had not been taught since the start of Term 3. While the LO teacher, who also teaches English, is said to be sick, there was no explanation for where the Maths Lit teacher was. Parents said they had made countless complaints about the matter, but nothing…

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By JOY HINYIKIWILE With the country’s unemployment rate at an all-time high, Joza’s Assumption Development Centre (ADC) has committed to placing 117 unemployed people in local organisations and businesses as interns. The ADC, a skills training and small business development centre, is one of several partner organisations that have received a grant from the Social Employment Fund to help fight unemployment. The organisations will provide internships to unemployed people between July this year and March next year for R23.19 per hour. The interns work an average of 15 hours a week. “We look for organisations that can help the interns…

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BY LESEDI MASOKO Many black families experience dreadful financial strain. The majority are unemployed, with no means of income, aside from government grants which are barely enough to sustain an individual, let alone a family. Umashonisa (loan sharks) circle in these waters, threatening the financial security of many with interest rates of up to 50%. Joza-based NGO the Assumption Development Centre (ADC) is on a mission to eradicate the mashonisa culture and restore the safety and dignity of vulnerable people. The organization has introduced a stokvel, known as ‘Save Aid’, for individuals and families to save money and lend at…

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BY MZWANDILE MAMAILA The Assumption Development Centre provides a Second Chance Matric Programme and other programs that young adults can use to upskill themselves. Through the second chance matric program, learners unsatisfied with their matric results can attend classes in the subjects they would like to upgrade. Necessary material is provided, such as textbooks, access to the internet, and assistance with university and job applications. Madoda Mkalipi has coordinated this program since 2019. He said the programme is in high demand. There were an astounding 300 applications this year, but they could only accept 125 due to lack of physical…

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By JOY HINYIKIWILE It is almost three weeks since the start of the third school term, and 15 Makhanda pupils have yet to return to school because they do not have reliable transport. The pupils, between Grades 4 and 11, live on farms in Sidbury and need to travel over 45km to their nearest public schools in Makhanda. Their latest transport issues began before the end of the previous school term when the bakkie that transported all 15 pupils – paid for by the families – broke down. “It was during exam time, but fortunately, our bosses were able to…

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By JOY HINYIKIWILE Grade 12 learner Zimbini Sintwa, 17, made history when she became the first Ntsika learner to make it to the English Olympiad Top 10 in the First Additional Language category. Zimbini, who wrote the 2022 English FAL Olympiad paper in March, said she was shocked to be ranked tenth since this was her first time entering the competition. “I actually didn’t know how to feel when I found out about the results. I entered the competition because I thought I could write. I’m just amazed to have made it to the Top 10,” she said. Her goal…

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By JOY HINYIKIWILE You have probably seen them in town or at the Settlers Monument playing traditional and popular South African sounds using marimbas. Four ex-prisoners – Andile Jaha (48), Zola Mqwebedu (37), Phumlani Sonwabe (37) and Thobelani Mali (33) – have been relentlessly sharing their music in the city. They were setting up their equipment at Peppergrove Mall when I asked to talk to them. The Makhanda men were serving prison sentences when they met and were taught to play the marimba. They came out of jail and decided to use their newly-learnt skill to turn their lives around.…

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